See The Difference!

This is an example of flash blended photography. This image was created by blending three flash pictures taken at different points and hand composited to the final image.

This is an example of flash blended photography. This image was created by blending three flash pictures taken at different points and hand composited to the final image.

This front entry image was photographed in HDR (High Dynamic Range). It is a composite of 5 images without the use of a flash.

This front entry image was photographed in HDR (High Dynamic Range). It is a composite of 5 images without the use of a flash.

HDR (High Dynamic Range) photography uses light found within the home. Interiors with high contrast provide good conditions for HDR photography.

HDR Photography is best used when the difference between the lightest and darkest part of the interior exceeds your camera’s dynamic range.

The goal is to get a closer representation of how your eye sees the interior. Your eye can see a much greater range than the camera sensor. This is why bracketed exposures are used to create the HDR image. I use Adobe Lightroom to create the HDR image.

My price for HDR photography is less expensive because the images can be taken much faster than setting up lighting equipment and hand editing each photograph. A average sized home can be photographed in 45 minutes to one hour.

Limitations of HDR photography

There are two main limitations of HDR photography. The first limitation is that bright windows facing the camera will render the furniture facing the camera dark when compared to flash photography.

The second limitation is that color temperature from fixtures usually varies from the color of the sunlight coming in to the home. Sunlight on a nice day is 5,000 degrees Kelvin with a CRI (Color Rendering Index) of 100. Setting your camera to capture sunlight, you’ll find the camera will place a value of approximately 5,500 kelvin to get an accurate color representation.. Most home fixtures (non-LED) are between 3,200 K and 3,600 K. This variation can render the scene with innaccurate color applied to wall and furniture. To control this, I simply take an exposure with a X-Rite Color Checker card. Doing so allows me to select what should be white in the scene which renders the correct color to walls and furniture.

Why should I use flash photography and why is it more expensive?

The two main reasons to use flash photography are to overcome the limitations of HDR photography. First, by adding flash, you are controlling where the light is coming from within the scene. If you have a bright window facing the camera, adding flash makes it easier to balance light from the window and inside. Providing this balance gives the camera sensor a better ability to interpret between the light and dark areas.

Secondly, camera flashes are usually calibrated to the sunlight setting of your camera - or 5,500 K. If you have two sources of light at a similar color temperature, then you have a much greater ability to capture the correct color.

When I add flash for real estate photography I don’t simply put a flash on top of my camera. This would make a flat, dull image. I add flash away from the camera to add direction and to provide lighting where the dark area in the scene is to dark for the camera sensor. Think of a bright kitchen to connects to a living room or den.

My price for lighting the home with flash is more expensive because it takes more time to light the home and the fact that it is more labor intensive to bring equipment and hand render each picture when compared to HDR photos that are render mostly by computer software.

If you want clean, color accurate, well-lit images that pop then using my flash photography service the way to go.